What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is known as porous bone, is a disease in which the bone mass and strength of your bone are reduced. As bone become porous, it is weak and easy for fractures during a fall. This is a common disease that the bone loss silently without symptoms. It can be prevented and treated.

What Causes Osteoporosis?

Throughout our lives, bones are constantly being renewed—new bones are being made and old bones are being broken down. As you age, this bone renewal process begins to slow down, thus losing bone mass. For people with osteoporosis, more and more bones are being broken down or lost, and not being replaced. The cause of osteoporosis developing in an individual depends mainly on how much bone mass you created in your youth, coupled with risk factors that you can change and not change.

Who is at risk for Osteoporosis?

  • Risk that cannot be changed:
    • Old age
    • Female gender
    • Small body size
    • History of fracture
  • Risk that can be changed:
    • Calcium and Vitamin D intake
    • Medication use
    • Lifestyle
    • Cigarette smoking
    • Alcohol intake

Common Symptoms*

Back pain, caused by a fractured or collapsed vertebra

  • Loss of height over time
  • A stooped posture
  • A bone that breaks much more easily than expected

How is Osteoporosis Treated?

The comprehensive treatment includes proper nutrition, adequate exercise, prevent falls and therapeutic medications for prevention.

The common medications by mouth are:

  • Calcium and Vitamin D – Vitamin D helps the absorption of calcium and support the strength of the muscles
  • Bisphosphonates – prevent the loss of the bone
  • Estrogen replacement therapy – conserve bone mass in post-menopausal women

*Please consult with your health care provider before making any health care decisions or guidance about a specific medical condition.

Our highly trained staff are here to offer knowledge and breakthrough medications that improve the quality of life of those that live with Osteoporosis.

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